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21 – Eye Opening Writing Tips from Well Known Authors

Writing success comes down to hard work, imagination, more hard work, passion – and then more hard work. Even if you are an absolutely fantastic writer who will be remembered for years to come, you will still most likely receive a good amount of criticism, rejection, and possibly ridicule before you get there.  It happens to everyone, no matter whom they are, and should come as no real surprise. These writers, having been through it all, offer us some writing tips without pulling punches.

  • I would advise anyone who aspires to a writing career that before developing his talent he would be wise to develop a thick hide. — Harper Lee
  • A scrupulous writer, in every sentence that he writes, will ask himself at least four questions, thus: What am I trying to say? What words will express it? What image or idiom will make it clearer? Is this image fresh enough to have an effect? And he will probably ask himself two more: Could I put it more shortly? Have I said anything that is avoidably ugly? . George Orwell
  • Find a subject you care about and which you in your heart feel others should care about. It is this genuine caring, and not your games with language, which will be the most compelling and seductive element in your style. ― Kurt Vonnegut
  • In the planning stage of a book, don’t plan the ending. It has to be earned by all that will go before it. — Rose Tremain
  • You don’t start out writing good stuff. You start out writing crap and thinking its good stuff, and then gradually you get better at it. That’s why I say one of the most valuable traits is persistence. — Octavia Butler
  • You can’t wait for inspiration. You have to go after it with a club. ― Jack London
  • Introduce your main characters and themes in the first third of your novel. If you are writing a plot-driven genre novel make sure all your major themes/plot elements are introduced in the first third, which you can call the introduction. Develop your themes and characters in your second third, the development. Resolve your themes, mysteries and so on in the final third, the resolution. — Michael Moorcock
  • Writing a book is a horrible, exhausting struggle, like a long bout with some painful illness. One would never undertake such a thing if one was not driven on by some demon that one can neither resist nor understand. — George Orwell
  • There are three rules for writing a novel. Unfortunately, no one knows what they are. ― W. Somerset Maugham
  • If you don’t have time to read, you don’t have the time — or the tools — to write. – Stephen King
  • The nearest I have to a rule is a Post-it on the wall in front of my desk saying ‘Faire et se taire’ (Flaubert), which I translate for myself as ‘Shut up and get on with it.’” — Helen Simpson
  • Don’t tell me the moon is shining; show me the glint of light on broken glass.– Anton Chekhov
  • Remember: when people tell you something’s wrong or doesn’t work for them, they are almost always right. When they tell you exactly what they think is wrong and how to fix it, they are almost always wrong. – Neil Gaiman
  • The main rule of writing is that if you do it with enough assurance and confidence, you’re allowed to do whatever you like. (That may be a rule for life as well as for writing. But it’s definitely true for writing.) So write your story as it needs to be written. Write it honestly, and tell it as best you can. I’m not sure that there are any other rules. Not ones that matter.— Neil Gaiman
  • If writing seems hard, it’s because it is hard. It’s one of the hardest things people do. – William Zinsser
  • Get through a draft as quickly as possible. Hard to know the shape of the thing until you have a draft. Literally, when I wrote the last page of my first draft of Lincoln’s Melancholy I thought, Oh, shit, now I get the shape of this. But I had wasted years, literally years, writing and re-writing the first third to first half. The old writer’s rule applies: Have the courage to write badly. – Joshua Wolf Shenk
  • Substitute ‘damn’ every time you’re inclined to write ‘very;’ your editor will delete it and the writing will be just as it should be. – Mark Twain
  • The first draft of everything is shit. -Ernest Hemingway
  • Start telling the stories that only you can tell, because there’ll always be better writers than you and there’ll always be smarter writers than you. There will always be people who are much better at doing this or doing that — but you are the only you. ― Neil Gaiman
  • You must stay drunk on writing so reality cannot destroy you. ― Ray Bradbury
  • Don’t take anyone’s writing advice too seriously. – Lev Grossman

Even famous authors on occasion have a tough time, and often go through periods of self-doubt.  So take a lesson from them and never give up.  Don’t put off your writing plans.  There has never been a better time than now to realize your dream of becoming a published author.  Tell your story and let your voice be heard!

Solitaire

www.solitaireparke.com

 

 

 

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5 Stars!! Silver Knight by Caron Rider

Caron Rider’s, “Silver Knight,” constitutes book one in the Silver Series.  Diana, the lead character is an unfortunate soul, either gifted or cursed to hop scotch through time with the dubious job of hunting and killing demons wherever they are found.  Inexorably drawn to important times in history, and generally being victimized by them, she is helped and sometimes hindered by the very entities that she hunts.

The story bounces back and forth through historical events, telling them in such a way that the reader is challenged to determine how much is truly fact and how much is fiction.  Caron’s descriptions are rich and thick with environmental backdrops that both add and give motivation to the story.  The back and forth method of storytelling has been one of my personal favorites through my life, so this book appealed to me both at the intellectual and the emotional levels.

Aided by her friends, Sam and Maggie, Diana’s life almost comes across as a parody when compared to theirs.  The result is a fresh approach to good vs. evil, light vs. dark, where the line drawn between them becomes faded and sometimes lost.  In the end you’re not sure who to root for, proving that truth and following the light is not as easy as it looks.  I genuinely had a good time reading this book and look forward to the second installment!  Great job Caron!!

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