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33 Fiction Writing Tips

Writing fiction can be complex and multifaceted.  There are countless details to consider throughout the process.  There’s the initial brainstorming, the outlining, the countless hours of research, the actual writing, and the inevitable revising.  As if that wasn’t enough, you still have the editing process, a monumental task of its own.  All this to create what you hope will be an amazing work of fiction that readers will fall in love with.  Not much to ask, right?

In doing this research, I’ve gathered an immeasurable amount of ideas concerning fiction writing.  These writing tips, from countless sources, might be helpful to other writers tackling a novel by offering different viewpoints and by providing food for the creative process.

Hopefully, the tips below will help make writing that novel a little easier.

Writing Tips

  1. Read more fiction than you write.
  2. Don’t lock yourself into one genre (in reading or writing). Even if you have a favorite genre, step outside of it occasionally.
  3. Protect the time and space in which you write. Keep everybody away from it, even the people who are most important to you.
  4. Dissect and analyze stories you love from books, movies, and television to find out what works in storytelling and what doesn’t.
  5. Don’t write for the market. Tell the story that’s in your heart. You can make an outline before, during, or after you finish your rough draft. It will provide you with a road map, which is a powerful tool to have at your disposal.
  6. Some of the best fiction comes from real life. Jot down stories that interest you whether you hear them from a friend or read them in a news article.
  7. Real life is also a great source of inspiration for characters. Look around at your friends, family, and coworkers. Magnify and mix the strongest aspects of their personalities, and you’re on your way to crafting a cast of believable characters.
  8. Make your characters real through details rather than lengthy head-to-toe physical descriptions.
  9. The most realistic and relatable characters are flawed. Find something good about your villain and something dark in your hero’s past.
  10. Avoid telling readers too much about the characters. Instead, show the characters’ personalities through their actions and interactions.
  11. Give your characters difficult obstacles to overcome. Make them suffer. That way, when they triumph, it will be even more rewarding.
  12. Cultivate a distinct voice. Your narrator should not sound warm and friendly in the first few chapters and then objective and aloof in later chapters. The voice should be consistent, and its tone should complement the content of your book.
  13. Give careful consideration to the narrative point of view. Is the story best told in first person or third person? If you’re not sure, write a few pages in each narrative point of view to see what works best.
  14. Is your story moving too fast for readers or are they yawning through every paragraph? Are the love scenes too short? Are the fight scenes too long? Do you go into three pages of detail as your characters walk from point A to point B and then fly through an action sequence in a couple of short paragraphs? Pay attention to pacing!
  15. Infuse your story with rich themes to give it a humanistic quality. Examples of themes include sacrifice, redemption, rebirth, life and death, faith, destiny, etc. These are the big shadows that hover over your story.
  16. Make sure you understand that every story needs a beginning, middle, and an end.
  17. Use symbols and imagery to create continuity throughout your story. Think about how the White Rabbit kept popping up when Alice was adventuring through Wonderland or how the color red was used in the film American Beauty. These are subtle details that give your story great power.
  18. Every great story includes transformation. The characters change, the world changes, and hopefully, the reader will change too.
  19. Enrich your main plot with subplots. In real life, there’s a lot happening at once.
  20. There is a difference between a sub-plot and a tangent. Don’t go off on too many tangents.
  21. If you write in a genre, don’t be afraid to blur the lines. A horror story can have funny moments and a thriller can have a bit of romance.
  22. Make sure your setting is vivid and realistic even if you made it up.
  23. If you didn’t make up your setting, then do your best to get to the location and see it for yourself before you finish your manuscript. If that’s not possible, get busy researching.
  24. Give the readers room to think. You don’t have to tell your story in minute detail, including each minute of the plot’s timeline or all of the characters’ thoughts. Provide enough dots, and trust that the reader will be able to connect them when your story makes time jumps.
  25. Let the readers use their imaginations with your story’s descriptions as well. Provide a few choice details and let the readers fill in the rest of the canvas with their own colors.
  26. Don’t focus exclusively on storytelling at the expense of compelling language.
  27. Appeal to readers’ senses. Use descriptive words that engage the readers’ senses of taste, touch, sound, sight, and smell.
  28. Apply poetry techniques to breathe life into your prose. Use alliteration, onomatopoeia, metaphor, and other literary devices to make your sentences sing and dance.
  29. When rewriting, check for the following: plot holes, character inconsistencies, missing scenes, extraneous scenes, accuracy in research, and of course, grammar, spelling, and punctuation.
  30. As you revise, ask yourself whether every paragraph, sentence, and word is essential to your story. If it’s not, you know where the delete button is.
  31. Before your final revisions and before you send your manuscript out to any agents or editors, find your beta readers: join a writing group, take a fiction workshop, or hire a pro.
  32. Do not send out your rough draft. Go through the revision process at least three times before handing it out to your beta readers. The stronger it is when you bring in editors, the stronger those editors will be able to make it.
  33. Have fun. If you’re not enjoying writing, then maybe it’s not for you. If you’re not enjoying fiction writing, try something else, like poetry, blogging, or screenwriting. Be willing to experiment and you’ll find your way.

Were these writing tips helpful? Got any tips to add? Leave a comment!

Check on the website for my “Dragomeir Series” (for dragon lovers) and various other genres,

    And updates on my latest series – “Daughter of the Dark Lord.”  Interesting EXTRAS available too!

    Solitaire

    www.solitaireparke.com

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    21 – Eye Opening Writing Tips from Well Known Authors

    Writing success comes down to hard work, imagination, more hard work, passion – and then more hard work. Even if you are an absolutely fantastic writer who will be remembered for years to come, you will still most likely receive a good amount of criticism, rejection, and possibly ridicule before you get there.  It happens to everyone, no matter whom they are, and should come as no real surprise. These writers, having been through it all, offer us some writing tips without pulling punches.

    • I would advise anyone who aspires to a writing career that before developing his talent he would be wise to develop a thick hide. — Harper Lee
    • A scrupulous writer, in every sentence that he writes, will ask himself at least four questions, thus: What am I trying to say? What words will express it? What image or idiom will make it clearer? Is this image fresh enough to have an effect? And he will probably ask himself two more: Could I put it more shortly? Have I said anything that is avoidably ugly? . George Orwell
    • Find a subject you care about and which you in your heart feel others should care about. It is this genuine caring, and not your games with language, which will be the most compelling and seductive element in your style. ― Kurt Vonnegut
    • In the planning stage of a book, don’t plan the ending. It has to be earned by all that will go before it. — Rose Tremain
    • You don’t start out writing good stuff. You start out writing crap and thinking its good stuff, and then gradually you get better at it. That’s why I say one of the most valuable traits is persistence. — Octavia Butler
    • You can’t wait for inspiration. You have to go after it with a club. ― Jack London
    • Introduce your main characters and themes in the first third of your novel. If you are writing a plot-driven genre novel make sure all your major themes/plot elements are introduced in the first third, which you can call the introduction. Develop your themes and characters in your second third, the development. Resolve your themes, mysteries and so on in the final third, the resolution. — Michael Moorcock
    • Writing a book is a horrible, exhausting struggle, like a long bout with some painful illness. One would never undertake such a thing if one was not driven on by some demon that one can neither resist nor understand. — George Orwell
    • There are three rules for writing a novel. Unfortunately, no one knows what they are. ― W. Somerset Maugham
    • If you don’t have time to read, you don’t have the time — or the tools — to write. – Stephen King
    • The nearest I have to a rule is a Post-it on the wall in front of my desk saying ‘Faire et se taire’ (Flaubert), which I translate for myself as ‘Shut up and get on with it.’” — Helen Simpson
    • Don’t tell me the moon is shining; show me the glint of light on broken glass.– Anton Chekhov
    • Remember: when people tell you something’s wrong or doesn’t work for them, they are almost always right. When they tell you exactly what they think is wrong and how to fix it, they are almost always wrong. – Neil Gaiman
    • The main rule of writing is that if you do it with enough assurance and confidence, you’re allowed to do whatever you like. (That may be a rule for life as well as for writing. But it’s definitely true for writing.) So write your story as it needs to be written. Write it honestly, and tell it as best you can. I’m not sure that there are any other rules. Not ones that matter.— Neil Gaiman
    • If writing seems hard, it’s because it is hard. It’s one of the hardest things people do. – William Zinsser
    • Get through a draft as quickly as possible. Hard to know the shape of the thing until you have a draft. Literally, when I wrote the last page of my first draft of Lincoln’s Melancholy I thought, Oh, shit, now I get the shape of this. But I had wasted years, literally years, writing and re-writing the first third to first half. The old writer’s rule applies: Have the courage to write badly. – Joshua Wolf Shenk
    • Substitute ‘damn’ every time you’re inclined to write ‘very;’ your editor will delete it and the writing will be just as it should be. – Mark Twain
    • The first draft of everything is shit. -Ernest Hemingway
    • Start telling the stories that only you can tell, because there’ll always be better writers than you and there’ll always be smarter writers than you. There will always be people who are much better at doing this or doing that — but you are the only you. ― Neil Gaiman
    • You must stay drunk on writing so reality cannot destroy you. ― Ray Bradbury
    • Don’t take anyone’s writing advice too seriously. – Lev Grossman

    Even famous authors on occasion have a tough time, and often go through periods of self-doubt.  So take a lesson from them and never give up.  Don’t put off your writing plans.  There has never been a better time than now to realize your dream of becoming a published author.  Tell your story and let your voice be heard!

    Solitaire

    www.solitaireparke.com

     

     

     

    New Novel on the Horizon

     

    It’s about time for another novel, this time Part Two of the Daughter of the Dark Lord Series.  The first book, Daughter of the Dark Lord – Part One – The Burning Sky, has been out for a while now, and is available at a variety of locations – all of which can be reached from my website www.solitaireparke.com.

    I am very anxious for you to read the Daughter of the Dark Lord books as they are the prequels to my previously published Dragomeir Series –  a must read for anyone who loves dragons and other wonderful creatures – also available at my website.  I’ve always been intrigued by dragons.  They are magnificent creatures who interact in the most extraordinary ways with their riders and fellow beings, and have characteristics that are remarkably like humans at times.  They’re really quite wonderful, contrary to all the bad press they’ve been given so much of the time.

    The second book in the series, Daughter of the Dark Lord – Part Two – The Alberra Project, is almost finished, I am happy to say.  These last few months have been a bit crazy, as life and the consequent stress of other projects seemed to take over from time to time, but I am hard at work on Book Two and it has progressed quite nicely.  So, before long it will move forward into editing mode, there will be a cover reveal, and it should be out before year’s end.
    In the meantime, check out my other books at www.solitaireparke.com.

    Solitaire

    Happy Summer Reading!

     

     

     

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    In Honor of Fathers –

    Father’s day is just a few days away.  It’s a time of honoring your father and his contributions to your life.  This day is dedicated to all the fathers in the world who have given many sacrifices in bringing up their children and molding them into better people.

    Here are some of the famous quotes for special fathers. 

     

    • “A man never stands as tall as when he kneels to help a child.”

     

    • “A father is a fellow who has replaced the currency in his wallet with the snapshots of his kids and family.”

     

    • “It is not flesh and blood, but the heart which makes us fathers and sons.”

     

    • “Father!—to God himself we cannot give a holier name!” – William Wordsworth

     

    • “The imprint of a father remains forever on the life of the child.” – Roy Lessin

     

    • “We never know the love of a parent till we become parents ourselves.” – Henry Ward Beecher

     

    • “My father gave me my dreams. Thanks to him, I could see a future.” – Liza Minnelli

     

    • “The greatest mark of a father is how he treats his children when no one is looking.” – Dan Pearce

     

    • “A father is the one friend upon whom we can always rely. In the hour of need, when all else fails, we remember him upon whose knees we sat when children, and who soothed our sorrows; and even though he may be unable to assist us, his mere presence serves to comfort and strengthen us.” – Émile Gaboriau

     

    • “Good fathers do three things: they provide, they nurture and they guide.” – Roland Warren

     

    • “A good father is one of the most unsung, unpraised, unnoticed and yet one of the most valuable assets in our society.” – Billy Graham

     

    • “Sometimes the poorest man leaves his children the richest inheritance.” – Ruth E. Renkel

     

    •  “One father is more than a hundred schoolmasters.” – George Herbert

     

    • “Real fatherhood means love and commitment and sacrifice and a willingness to share responsibility, and not walking away from one’s children.” – William Bennett

     

    • Fatherhood is a very natural thing; it’s not something that shakes up my life but rather it enriches it.” – Andrea Bocelli

     

    To all of you who have been lucky enough to have a wonderful father, or those of you who are working hard at being a great father – HAPPY FATHER’S DAY!!!

     

    Solitaire –

    www.solitaireparke.com

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    6 Ways to Improve Your Writing!

    1.  How often do you use the word “very” in your writing? It is often extremely overused and can make your sentences sound weak.  So check out this site.  It gives you 128 ways to avoid using this word by replacing it with stronger more vibrant ones.

    http://writetodone.com/128-words-to-use-instead-of-very/

     

    1. Need some help with your grammar? Take the following quiz and find out how much you know.

    http://writetodone.com/grammar-tips-for-writers/

     

    1. Book titles, blog headings, or other articles are sometimes difficult to come by. You might need a little help occasionally.  Here are 7 tools to provide that help.

    http://writetodone.com/bestselling-book-titles-2/

    1. Do you love the television show “Game of Thrones” or the books? Here are 5 lessons to be learned from them.

    http://www.thecreativepenn.com/2014/04/08/writing-game-of-thrones/

    1. Do you know how to research a novel, and when to stop? This article could be helpful.

    http://www.thecreativepenn.com/2017/01/18/research-a-novel/

     

    1. Tips for finding those eye-catching images for your books, articles, or blogs.

    http://bookmarketingmaven.typepad.com/book_marketing_maven/2015/02/ultimate-guide-to-finding-images-for-book-promotion.html

    Which ones are your favorites?

    If these were helpful to you, please pass them on!

    Visit me at my website – sp@solitaireparke.com

    Solitaire

     

    What Foods Should Creative Minds Eat?

    blueberries

    If you’re struggling with feeling tired, uninspired, or have writer’s block, maybe you should take a good look at your diet.  We tend to blame everything for not being at our peak performance, but what if it’s partially as a result of what we eat?  Creative minds place very tall demands on our brains, and to do our best work we should think about what affects our productivity.  We probably won’t produce our best work if our bodies feel tired and sluggish. So check out the list below:

    FOODS FOR CREATIVITY

    • FISH – High in Omega3 fats which are essential for healthy brain function
    • EGGS – Contains choline which enhances memory and reaction times
    • WHOLE WHEAT BREAD, PASTA, AND BROWN RICE – They are digested more

    slowly than their white equivalents, so you don’t experience creativity-killing energy

    highs and lows

     

    • BANANAS – Contains potassium needed for oxygen flow to the brain, keeps energy levels up with just the right amount of glucose

     

    • BLUEBERRIES – Contain antioxidants which improve memory

     

    • UNSALTED NUTS AND SEEDS – Great source of proteins and fats which provide long-lasting energy

     

    • BROCCOLI – Your brain’s best friend. Contains Vitamin K which enhances cognitive functions – works best when eaten raw or roasted with olive oil and garlic

     

    • SWEET POTATO CRISPS – Baked crisps, thinly sliced, with a little salt. Contains more potassium than bananas – needed for oxygen flow to the brain

     

     

    If you know there are certain foods that will tempt you, just don’t keep them around.

    Make sure you don’t over-indulge.  Even healthy foods and snacks can quickly lead to a

    sugar crash.  (Avoid foods and snacks containing high fructose corn syrup).

    It’s always a good idea to eat a healthy breakfast to start your day.

    Have a snack a couple times during the day – maybe an apple or some unsalted nuts.

     

    These are some ideas that should help to keep the creativity flowing and keep your brain functioning all day.  So, what works for you?  If you have a special diet that helps you to write, think, and learn better, let us know.

    Solitaire

    www.solitaireparke.com

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    Friday the 13th – Why is it Considered Unlucky?

    thirteenth

    Don’t step on the sidewalk cracks, walk under any mirrors, and stay away from black cats are a few of the taboos on Friday the 13th.  We’ve all heard them before.   Most people do not take it too seriously, but there are some who dread the date. By the way, if you’re interested, the word paraskevidekatriaphobia means fear of Friday the 13th!  If you were looking for a definitive answer, there really isn’t one.   Like many cultural traditions and long-running superstitious beliefs, the exact source is unknown. It is most likely the result of many different factors, strengthened over time by a combination of specific incidents, folklore and religion that have evolved over hundreds of years to create what we now refer to as the unluckiest date in the calendar. Here are a few of the beliefs about Friday the 13th:

    1. Some superstitions about Friday the 13th are rooted in the guest list of the Last Supper. Judas was the 13th guest at the table, and Jesus was crucified on a Friday. Coincidence?
    2. On Friday the 13th in 1307, thousands of Knights Templar were arrested on orders from King Philip IV of France because of suspicions that their secret initiation rituals made them “enemies of the faith.” After years of torture, they were burned at the stake. Dan Brown’s novel The DaVinci Code popularized the link between the Knights Templar and Friday the 13th.
    3. The first specific written reference to Friday the 13th as an unlucky day was in an early-20th century novel by Thomas W. Lawson, called Friday, the 13th. Ironically, a ship named after Lawson was caught in a storm and shipwrecked on the night of Friday the 13th, 1907.
    4. Superstition can result in an economic dip. Donald Dossey, founder of the Stress Management Center and Phobia Institute, says U.S. businesses lose millions of dollars on Friday the 13th, because some people are reluctant to leave their homes.
    5. Friday’s position as the unlucky day may have been strengthened by it being the day of execution of criminals for many years, commonly called Hangman’s Day.
    6. Scandinavians believed 13 signified bad luck because their 13th mythological demigod Loki was an evil one who brought great misfortune upon humans.
    7. Hindus believed that it was unlucky for 13 people to gather in one place.
    8. Most skyscrapers and hotels lack a 13th floor, which specifically comes from the tendency in the early 1900s for buildings in New York City to omit the unlucky number (though both the Empire State Building and the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel have 13th floors). Street addresses sometimes skip from 12 to 14, while airports may skip the 13th gate.
    9. Allegedly, the popular Friday the 13th films were so-named just to cash in on this menacing date recognition, not because the filmmakers actually believed the date to be unlucky.
    1. Black cats have been seen in Western cultures as an omen of bad luck — they have been associated with witches, and many cultures believe that a black cat crossing your path means you will suffer disaster or even death. Gamblers are especially fearful of the black cat curse – many of them believe that if they see a black cat while going to a casino, they should abandon their plans to gamble there.

    Do you consider Friday the 13th to be an unlucky date? Has anything bad ever happened to you on this day before? Do you have any superstitions to help you avoid bad luck? Add your comments below.

    Solitaire

    www.solitaireparke.com

     

     

    HAVE A MERRY CHRISTMAS AND A HAPPY NEW YEAR 2017 EVERYONE!!!

    red-christmas-ball

    christmas

    This is such a crazy, busy time of year, but I wanted to stop for a minute – although I’m continuing to write amidst the chaos – and wish all of you an amazing and wonderful Merry Christmas and a New Year 2017 that’s filled with joy and prosperity!  Enjoy your friends and family, and be encouraged to go after your dreams in the New Year.  Do what you love and don’t listen to anyone who tells you not to go for it.  Be unstoppable and refuse to give up!

    BE AMAZING!!!

    Solitaire

    www.solitaireparke.com

     

    15 TV Shows & Movies with Genetically Modified Humans

    53_350x350_front_color-na

    Having just published a book about genetically altered children, Tinker Smith and the Conspiracy of Oz”, I thought it might be interesting to track down some of the TV series and movies where this possibility has been explored.  I have seen many of these, being a Sci-Fi buff.  I have quite a collection of DVDs that range from (in my opinion) great to really terrible, but I enjoy them all.  I have to say though, the Sci-Fi books in most cases, are far better than the movies.  I guess being an author I would say that, but I have found it to be true.

    Here are fifteen of them that you might want to check out –

    ROBOCOP – 1987 – In a dystopic and crime-ridden Detroit, a terminally wounded cop returns to the force as a powerful cyborg haunted by submerged memories.

    LUCY – 2014 – A woman, accidentally caught in a dark deal, turns the tables on her captors and transforms into a merciless warrior evolved beyond human logic.

    IN TIME – 2010 – In a future where people stop aging at 25, but are engineered to live only one more year, having the means to buy your way out of the situation is a shot at immortal youth.

    X-MEN – 2000 – Two mutants come to a private academy for their kind whose resident superhero team must oppose a terrorist organization with similar powers.

    TRANSDENDENCE – 2014 – A scientist’s drive for artificial intelligence, takes on dangerous implications when his consciousness is uploaded into one such program.

    DEADPOOL – 2016 – A fast-talking mercenary with a morbid sense of humor is subjected to a rogue experiment that leaves him with accelerated healing powers and a quest for revenge.

    ICE SOLDIERS – 2013 – A scientist discovers the bodies of three frozen genetically modified Russians buried in the Canadian North. Upon thawing them out he realizes he has unleashed a deadly threat to Western society and must stop them at all costs.

    GATTACA – 1997 – A genetically inferior man assumes the identity of a superior one in order to pursue his lifelong dream of space travel.

    PROMETHEUS – 2012 – Following clues to the origin of mankind, a team journey across the universe and find a structure on a distant moon containing a monolithic statue of a humanoid head and stone cylinders of alien blood but they soon find they are not alone.

    THE 6TH DAY – 2000 – Futuristic action about a man who meets a clone of himself and stumbles into a grand conspiracy about clones taking over the world.

    THE ISLAND OF DR. MOREAU – 1996 – After being rescued and brought to an island, a man discovers that its inhabitants are experimental animals being turned into strange-looking humans, all of it the work of a visionary doctor.

    HUMANOIDS FROM THE DEEP – 1996 – While a town is in a state of alert, the monster of the sea keeps mutating the townspeople at an alarming rate. A researcher finds a genetic disorder that has been caused by a chemical that has been dumped into the water that has caused the creature to have an alarming appetite.

    DARK ANGEL – TV – 2000 – A group of genetically-enhanced children escape from a lab project. Years later we meet Max, one of the escapees who now works for a messenger service in the post-apocalyptic Pacific Northwest.

    SPIDERMAN – 2002 -Having been bitten by a genetically modified spider, a nerdy, shy, and awkward high school student gains spider-like abilities that he eventually must use to fight evil as a superhero after tragedy befalls his family.

    THE FLY – 1986 – A brilliant but eccentric scientist begins to transform into a giant man/fly hybrid after one of his experiments goes horribly wrong.

    You’ll find my books at numerous locations – click here to learn more –   www.solitaireparke.com

    Solitaire

     

     

    New Website Coming Very Soon!

    VWbus2

    Hello fellow readers!  Can you believe it’s nearly September already?  Labor Day is nearly upon us.  We’re watching Summer pass us by and we’re heading into Fall again.   Well, at least some of the country gets to enjoy the autumn time of year.  Those of us who live in Arizona are still stuck in the “hot” time-warp zone.

    Time does fly when you have a million ideas in your head and are trying  to get your thoughts together for additional books, not to mention, “life” tends to hand us a myriad of interruptions every day.  I Just wanted to let you know that I’ve been really busy lately putting together an entirely new Website.  The new site will be easier to navigate and give you all kinds of engaging information about my books and a host of other topics and practical tips.  You’ll be able to read the latest updates, purchase books, read the current blog entries, go to my shop – The Omnicon, contact me, or just peruse the extras page for surprising or just plain fun information.  So stay tuned and join me for a few diversions, along with the latest information about the Dragomeir Series and some forthcoming new books!  It’ll be up soon, so keep in touch and have a great day!

    I hope you’ll join me at www.solitaireparke.com.

    Solitaire

     

     

     

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    Daily (w)rite

    A DAILY RITUAL OF WRITING

    ellisnelson

    children's author

    Ms Toy Whisperer

    I am a writer who sells vintage books and toys. I write about the whimsy of life, family, thrifting, everything and nothing and whispers of the Holy Spirit.

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    Failing better at writing, one try at a time

    James Harrington's Blog of Geek and Writing

    All Things Writing and Geek, in one neat little blog!

    O at the Edges

    Musings on poetry, language, perception, numbers, food, and anything else that slips through the cracks.

    Storyshucker

    A blog full of humorous and poignant observations.

    Chris Gardner

    The joys of self-publishing.

    A Writer's Path

    Sharing writing tips, information, and advice.

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    Part time actor, aspiring writer of poetry and prose and full-time idiot with a heart.

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    Writing is a painful journey- I just started and it hurts already

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    Illegal in 38 states--frowned upon in the rest.

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    A writing WordPress.com site

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    You need the world, and the world needs good people.

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    Official site of the the YA fantasy, sci-fi, and post-apocalyptic paranormal author

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    Vape Tips. Vape Reviews. Vape Life.

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    colourful language, colourful opinions

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    The End is only the Beginning.

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